Robert Kelly’s live BBC interview gatecrashed by his kids


The wrong Guy 

Arguably the most infamous of BBC News fails happened back in 2006, when a business graduate named Guy Goma arrived at the BBC studios in London to be interviewed for a job in the IT department.

Meanwhile British technology expert Guy Kewney was in the reception area preparing for a live interview on the court case between Apple computers and the Apple Corps record company. 

Business graduate Guy Goma arrived at the BBC studios to be interviewed for a job in the IT department but found himself being mistaken for someone else and interview on live TV

Business graduate Guy Goma arrived at the BBC studios to be interviewed for a job in the IT department but found himself being mistaken for someone else and interview on live TV

The producer selected the wrong Guy from the wrong reception area and brought the business grad in for what he believed to be his job interview.

But moments later Goma found himself being asked difficult questions with a camera in his face.

Hoping to do a professional job and impress his potential employers, Goma decided to have a good go at answering the questions put to him and captured the hearts of the nation.

Another mistaken identity causes humiliation

In January, two BBC presenters were left red faced after a mix up which saw an academic confused with a mountain climber on live TV.

Rachel Burden and Jon Kay introduced their next guest as mountaineer Leslie Binns, only to discover the man sitting on the sofa was political scientist Todd Landman, who was there to discuss relations between the US and Russia.

Realising the blunder, Ms Burden said, as the cameras rolled: ‘It is ever so funny, I looked at this man and thought he doesn’t necessarily look like a mountaineer.’

When the camera panned to Professor Landman, the bemused expert said: ‘I think you have the wrong guest Sir.’

Mr Kay then asked: ‘Do you have any heroic stories to tell us?’

Prof Landman responded: ‘I have lots of heroic stories but not involving Everest.’

The iPad that looked suspiciously like a stack of paper

Simon McCoy left viewers baffled in 2013 when he introduced a feature about ‘drunk tanks’ by holding something slightly less technical.

The 51-year-old broadcaster had intended to pick up his trusted iPad when the cameras prepared to roll in the BBC studios – but instead grabbed a pack of photocopier paper.

Viewers saw McCoy holding the packet in a full-length shot as he hosted the item live on the rollling BBC News channel without any explanation.

But the BBC later said he had picked it up by mistake.

Although he realised his error, McCoy didn’t have time to swap his paper for the expensive gadget and instead ‘went with it’.

Viewers spotted that BBC News presenter Simon McCoy had picked up a pack of paper as a prop instead of an iPad by mistake

Viewers spotted that BBC News presenter Simon McCoy had picked up a pack of paper as a prop instead of an iPad by mistake

 ‘Erm, well this is clearly the wrong picture’ 

In October last year, producers accidentally used a picture of fugitive London Zoo gorilla Kumbuka to illustrate a story about Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon.

BBC Breakfast presenter Naga Munchetty was telling viewers they would be joined by Ms Sturgeon later in the programme when footage of the 7ft-tall 29st gorilla, which escaped from its enclosure that week, was shown on the screen.

The TV anchor, who hosts BBC Breakfast alongside Charlie Stayt, burst into a fit of giggles after the photo of the gorilla was shown to promote an upcoming interview with the Scottish first minister.

London Zoo gorilla Kumbuka

Nicola Sturgeon

Producers accidentally used a picture of fugitive London Zoo gorilla Kumbuka to illustrate a story about Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon

The 51-year-old broadcaster had intended to pick up his trusted iPad when the cameras prepared to roll in the BBC studios – but instead grabbed a pack of photocopier paper.



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